Tag Archives: farro

Shortcut salad

 

shortcutsaladI had a head of cauliflower that was calling out to be roasted, so I took out a cookie sheet, set the oven to 400 degrees and cut off the woody parts of the vegetable. Then I broke and cut the cauliflower florets into small pieces, mixed them with a bit of olive oil and salt and spread them on the sheet, roasting until they were browning and a little crispy on the edges. That brings out and mellows the flavor of the cauliflower.

It would be easy to gobble up a whole head of cauliflower that way, but I resisted as I needed those tasty florets to go a little further.  I had in mind using them to make a nice healthy salad that I could put in the fridge so we could eat it for lunch or a snack.

Hmmm, wouldn’t it be good to have some chewy nutty farro as a base? –and some roasted peppers for color and flavor? Farro, an ancient strain of hard wheat, isn’t difficult to cook, but it does take a bit of time, and I just happened to have Trader Joe’s 10-minute farro on hand, as well as a jar of roasted yellow and red peppers.

shortcut2I am usually reluctant to admit that I use some shortcuts, but that is pretty silly. Why not use shortcuts if the ingredients are healthy and they make your life a little easier?

shortcut3The finished salad also had chopped green onion, parsley and mint and a dressing made of my favorite trio: lemon juice, olive oil and salt.

Variations? Of course! You could add beans, a different grain, a different vegetable, other herbs, vinegar in place of lemon, etc. etc. In fact, I had some leftover salad and I added sliced Kalamata olives, some pickled beets (also from a jar) and more lemon juice to freshen it up — and the second variation was good too.

I just wish I always had a vegetable-based salad or soup in the fridge for the best healthy fast food. It’ll probably never happen, but if shortcuts help me toward that goal, I’m all for them!

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Filed under salad, soup, Uncategorized, vegetables

Summer’s salad days

faro, asp, bean, chive salad

Farro, asparagus, navy beans and chives

Summer is certainly salad season, with its rich selection of fresh vegetables and herbs. Nearly every salad I make has a simple basic dressing: olive oil, lemon juice and salt. Sometimes I use another oil (a little walnut oil, perhaps?) or vinegar or even lime instead of the lemon, and sometimes I add a little mustard, garlic, lemon zest  or Parmesan to the dressing — but I never get tired of the basic threesome of oil, lemon and salt! Here are some of the salads we’ve been enjoying recently.

chives

Karen’s chives

It’s so nice to have fresh herbs in the garden (or in a pot). These chives belong to my generous next-door neighbor, Karen, who lets me cut all I want. I’m growing thyme, oregano, tarragon, mint, basil and dill, and they often find their way into my salads.

My basil harvest

My basil harvest

broccpotatosalad

Broccoli, potato, red pepper, basil

broccpotatodill

Potatoes, rapini, carrots and dill

Many of the vegetables are from the farmers’ market or fruit and vegetable stands.

rapini

Rapini looks like broccoli tops but is actually a member of the turnip family. Go figure.

Here’s a good article about how the Italians cook rapini.

salmoninsalad

Green salad with sockeye salmon, eggs, beets, cannellini beans and fresh herbs.

It was difficult to save a piece of the Copper River salmon from dinner the night before, but we restrained ourselves and had this great salad for lunch the next day.

tunaandbeans2

Tuna with cannellini beans, preserved lemon and green onions, on lettuce. Tasted better than it looks.

I see I’ve been making a lot of salads with white beans, cannellini if I can find good ones, or navy beans. cannellinibeans

It’s not much trouble (but takes a little planning) to soak them overnight in some salty water, then drain the next day, cover with cold unsalted water,  a bay leaf and a  couple cloves of garlic and cook until tender. But it’s easier and also fine to use canned beans.

brocc, bean salad

Broccoli, white beans, and red onions

blackbeanandcorn saladAnd today’s lunch: The salad was black beans (from a can) and corn kernels, with chopped red onion, raw chard, a little bit of chicken and lots of cilantro and lime. It was nicely set off with a corn-flour tortilla and a couple of slices of melon.

I’ve also been making some salads with bulgur as well as classic cucumber salads with vinegar, dill, salt and a touch of sugar. I just bought some beautiful green beans, fennel and purple carrots from the farmers’ market. . . so I am thinking about the next salads.

purplecarrots

Let the vegetables be the inspiration. Purple carrots with orange insides would look great with a deep green of broccoli or green beans.

What salads have you been making? Happy 4th of July and enjoy these salad days of summer!

Also see:
Salads, salads, salads (and a riot of color)
Road trip salads

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Filed under salad, spring, summer, Uncategorized

Feast for the eyes (and more)

Ventura farmers' market

Ventura farmers’ market

Well, I haven’t been keeping up with this blog lately. It’s not that I don’t cook — with all the farmers’ markets here in Southern California, there’s always fresh inspiration — but I’ve been too involved in other things to write the blog. Such as walking on the beach, volunteering for Carpinteria Seal Watch, watching surfers and dolphins and gray whales, going to farmers markets, eating at taquerias….etc.

annashousecitrus

Anna Thomas’ citrus display

If you’ve read my blog long enough, you know that I’m crazy about citrus. It’s local food here in the winter and a great reason to bend the rules about local if you live anywhere else. After all, people have been importing citrus for hundreds of years!  Its bright colors and tastes bring sunshine to any winter day.

annashouseannaSpeaking of brightness and color, one of the bright spots of our month here was a generous invitation to lunch at the home of Anna Thomas, known to many as The Vegetarian Epicure. She has an intuitive sense of combining color and flavor for dazzling effect, a feast for the eyes as well as the stomach. (You can find out more about the wonderful kitchen she designed in a recent issue of Fine Cooking).

annashouse1She had gone shopping at the farmers’ market early that morning, and red kuri pumpkins (a type of squash you don’t need to peel, she told me), green tomatoes and onions were tossed with some olive oil and salt and roasted for a delicious healthy dish.

This was served atop her “tweed” pilaf (which I don’t seem to have a photo of), composed of farro and black rice, cooked separately and then combined with sauteed onions. Another visually pleasing as well as tasty dish. What a good idea!annashouselunchAnd then there was a lovely salad of dandelion greens, radicchio, Asian pear and toasted pecans. Yum! It all tasted as good as it looked or visa versa, and kept us smiling the rest of the day. Thank you, Anna.

annashousepomegranate

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Filed under Praise for other cooks, salad, Uncategorized, vegetables, winter